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  • Become a Professional Wellcoach | Wellcoaches

    Advanced Coach Training for the Certified Coach Info Session Health and Well-being Coach Lifestyle Medicine Coach Professional Coach What is a professional coach? Start making plans to lift your coaching mastery to a galactic orbit with our ten-month advanced Professional Coach Training & Certification Program. This advanced program is specially designed for Certified Wellcoaches, or Nationally Board Certified Coaches or ICF-PCC/MCC Coaches only.. This program is developing the future leaders of the health and wellness coaching industry. We built and continue to upgrade an innovative, science and neuroscience-based, robust coaching framework we call the "Onward & Upward Model" designed to enable Certified coaches to help clients optimize mental and physical well-being. This is a hit-the-ball-out-of-the-park opportunity for Certified coaches who want to be masterful coaches. Ready for coaching mastery What Our Students Say “I am so sad this class has come to an end. The course has been transformational to me personally and professionally.” “This course not only enhances the coach's approach, it is transformative on a personal level.” “The information in this course is fantastic. There is a lot to digest and assimilate and I cherish the value of all that I am learning.” Already a Certified Wellcoach®? Trainees who complete the sequence of Wellcoaches Core Health & Well-being Coach Training Program (HWCT) and the 9-month Advanced Professional Coach Training Program (PCT) may earn 132.5 ICF Coach Specific Training Hours and apply for an ICF credential (ACC or PCC) via the ACTP Path. ​ This ACTP path is only available for students who have first complete the Wellcoaches training program (Modules 1-3). Already a National Board Certified Coach? The Professional Coach Training Program is approved for 36 Continuing Education hours! ​ 1. Become a Certified Coach Step 1. Become a Certified Health and Well-being Coach FIRST, earn your Wellcoaches Certification by completing Modules 1-3 . ​ Or earn your National Board Certified Health and Wellness Coach designation. Or, earn your PCC or MCC through the International Coach Federation. ​ Learn how to do this Step 2: Complete advanced coach training and certification ​ Cost: $4100 plus travel and resources Two 2.5 day residential sessions in January and September each year 32 ninety-minute teleclasses with the ability to practice new tools and skills in class, including 8 group coaching sessions. Six private mentor coaching sessions with feedback from coaching masters regarding the application of Wellcoaches protocols and International Coach Federation Competencies A reading list of over 20 carefully chosen books written by scientists and psychologists with a strong evidence basis Learn more and register now! 2. Complete advanced coach training and certification In Summary... To become a Wellcoaches Certified Professional Coach: ​ Be sure you meet the educational pre-requisites 1. Complete an eligible coach certification. 2. Complete the 9-month Professional Coach Training Program 3. Earn an ICF Certification ​ Not a Certified Wellcoach® yet? See Module 1 schedule to get started! Already a Certified Wellcoach, NBC-HWC or ICF Certified? Register now! Testimonials I had wanted to attend PCT for 7 years and when I finally did, it exceeded my expectations! I took the class hoping for 3 things: first, that my coaching skill would be elevated to a higher level; second, that I would be personally transformed; and third, that I would establish new meaningful relationships with other coaches. All these things took place – and not just as an event occurring at a particular moment in time, but as a seed that was planted and continues to grow and bear fruit. The initial residential experience established us as a deeply connected group. It laid a foundation of trust and openness that facilitated a deepening connection throughout our classes and practice together during the months to come. The reading and related classes were incredibly enriching. The faculty was outstanding. The weekly online classes became a moment in the week we all looked forward to. The closing residential session was a reunion of dearest friends that took us to new depths of awareness and new vistas of personal vision. Like the ripples from a stone thrown in a pond, I will be feeling the effects of my PCT class for quite some time as I continue to learn and grow. I am incredibly grateful to have taken this class. Joanna Thomas, NBC-HWC

  • PCT 2023 Program | Wellcoaches

    Professional Coach Training: Next Session 2023 Once you have completed our Core Coach Training & Certification program, start making plans to lift your coaching mastery to a galactic orbit with our 9-month advanced Professional Coach Training & Certification Program. This advanced program is specially designed for our Certified Wellcoaches, Nationally Board Certified Coaches or ICF-PCC/MCC Coaches only. This program is developing the future leaders of the health and wellness coaching industry. We built and continue to upgrade an innovative, science and neuroscience-based, robust coaching framework we call the "Onward & Upward Model" designed to enable Certified coaches to help clients optimize mental and physical well-being. This is a hit-the-ball-out-of-the-park opportunity for Certified coaches who want to be masterful coaches. Graduates of the 2022 Program What will you gain 1. Unique-to-Wellcoaches intellectual framework and mechanisms for peak coaching performance grounded in research from the fields of neuroscience, adult development, behavioral and positive psychology 2. Cutting-edge and advanced coaching models such as Immunity to Change, advanced mindfulness and multiplicity of the mind 3. Plenty of practice using cutting-edge tools and models in a safe, structured environment 4. Individualized mentoring feedback from experienced Wellcoaches faculty Registration Training Only - does not include travel, lodging, food or materials: $4100 Open to coaches who are Certified by Wellcoaches, have earned the NBC-HWC from the National Board for Health and Wellness Coaching, or have the International Coach Federation PCC or MCC certifications. Register now Class Dates Residential #1: Jan 18-20, 2023 Wed, 8-5 Thu, 8-5 Fri, 8-4 ​ Residential #2: Sep 13-15, 2023 Wed, 8-5 Thu, 8-5 Fri, 8-4 Virtual classroom: 32, 1. 5 hours virtual classes Weekly ​ ​ Teleclasses are held on Thursdays from 4-5:30pm ET each week (except major holidays) beginning Jan 2023. ​ Class Location The residential sessions will be held at the Empress Hotel in LaJolla, California. ​ 7766 Fay Ave La Jolla, CA 92037 ​ You may stay at any hotel you wish, of course. ​ Deadlines Early Bird registration deadline ($250 discount): Nov 30, 2022 Registration deadline: December 29, 2022 ​ ​ Materials 20 books will be recommended for purchase (all available on Amazon) ​ A small sample of the reading we’ll experience together: Emotional Agility Flow Non-Violent Communication The Compassion Instinct Instant Influence Flourish Succeed Become a Certified Professional Wellcoach® The 2023 training program components delivered over nine months includes: ​ Two 2.5 day residential sessions, one at the beginning and one at the end of the training program. 32 ninety-minute teleclasses with the ability to practice new tools and skills in class, including 8 group coaching sessions. Teleclasses are held on Thursdays from 4-5:30pm ET each week (except major holidays) beginning Jan 2023. Six private mentor coaching sessions with feedback from coaching masters regarding the application of Wellcoaches protocols and International Coach Federation Competencies A reading list of over 20 carefully chosen books written by scientists and psychologists with a strong evidence basis Full attendance is required for course completion ​ Registration Training Only - does not include travel, lodging, food or materials: $4100 Open to coaches who are Certified by Wellcoaches, have earned the NBC-HWC from the National Board for Health and Wellness Coaching, or have the International Coach Federation PCC or MCC certifications. Register now Sample Course Topics Strengths Self-Determination and Motivation Optimism Non-violent Communication Goal-setting Theory Relational Cultural Theory Constructive Development Emotional Intelligence Subject-object Theory and Order of Consciousness Flow and Relational Flow Motivation and Meaning-making Positive Psychology Immunity to Change Curiosity Creativity Relationships Resilience Thriving Growth-Mindset Design Thinking Neuroscience Authenticity Four reasons to join 1. Leadership Role: Not only will our advanced program enable a giant leap in your coaching outcomes, it will help move you into a leadership role and new career opportunities within this growing industry. 2. Wellcoaches Opportunities: Wellcoaches recruits PCT graduates first for research projects, coaching contracts with our corporate partners, and coach referrals. 3. ICF Approved: Complete an International Coach Federation approved program which supports ICF certifications and credibility in the larger coaching industry beyond health and wellness. 4. Close Network: The PCT experience leads to a close and intimate network of your classmates that will pay dividends for years. Testimonials I had wanted to attend PCT for 7 years and when I finally did, it exceeded my expectations! I took the class hoping for 3 things: first, that my coaching skill would be elevated to a higher level; second, that I would be personally transformed; and third, that I would establish new meaningful relationships with other coaches. All these things took place – and not just as an event occurring at a particular moment in time, but as a seed that was planted and continues to grow and bear fruit. The initial residential experience established us as a deeply connected group. It laid a foundation of trust and openness that facilitated a deepening connection throughout our classes and practice together during the months to come. The reading and related classes were incredibly enriching. The faculty was outstanding. The weekly online classes became a moment in the week we all looked forward to. The closing residential session was a reunion of dearest friends that took us to new depths of awareness and new vistas of personal vision. Like the ripples from a stone thrown in a pond, I will be feeling the effects of my PCT class for quite some time as I continue to learn and grow. I am incredibly grateful to have taken this class. Joanna Thomas, NBC-HWC

  • Health Coach Training | Wellcoaches

    People powered Life changing Evidence based Become a National Board Certified Coach Free Information Session Register and Get Started You can count on becoming a confident coach Professional health and well-being coaches are expert facilitators of sustainable change in mindset and ​behaviors. Translating science and innovation into coaching practice, Wellcoaches teaches you how to use evidence-based coaching tools and processes designed to help others change, grow and thrive. You can count on becoming a competent and confident coach. We wrote the book - our Coaching Psychology Manual is our field’s textbook (45,000 copies sold) and underpins our training. Our proven protocol in 22 published studies with 30,000 coaching clients – learn more . Employers seek Wellcoaches Certification. Job Board 94% NBHWC exam pass rate by Certified Wellcoaches (1,000 strong) Everyone is welcome. Simplified prerequisites include those with an Associate Degree or 4000 hours of work experience. You determine your pace. You can become Wellcoaches Certified or National Board Eligible in 6 to 9 months. Accelerate by working on our Wellcoaches Habits e-course and Module 4 (National Certification Track) before live classes begin. We are your most affordable coaching training partner. Wellcoaches offers per module pricing and discounted tuition when bundled. Your only other cost is The Coaching Psychology Manual. More than 20 years as pioneering leaders , 14,000+ Coaches, 50+ Countries It’s a great book and it really helped me get my footing on coaching. It really addresses everything I wanted to know and more. I remember thinking every evening after reading a section that: “Wow, if I can get this down, I’d be a great coach” and I felt challenged and inspired. I still go back to it because some things they just explained so wonderfully. - Willem van der Walt, Agile Coach at Capitec Bank Apply for the National Board Certification after completing our certification program. Coach. We collaborate with partners, including the American College of Sports Medicine and the American College of Lifestyle Medicine, to help everyone who works in healthcare and wellness learn how to coach to improve health, well-being, and quality of life. We are also an approved training program for the National Board for Health and Wellness Coaching. ​ Together, let's create a world where everyone welcomes change, enjoys growth, and is good at both. Why Become a Coach How Coaching Works video The Science of Coaching Get Hired. Check out our Job Board Coming Soon - Wellcoaches Network! Statistically significant positive outcomes 194 coaches, 30,984 patients/clients, 128,076 coaching sessions The Wellcoaches Protocol of health/well-being coaching is the most thoroughly tested coaching protocol in the healthcare and well-being domains, resulting in positive, statistically significant outcomes in all 22 peer reviewed studies . One-page Summary All Research How Coaching Works video The Science of Coaching Testimonials My experience with Wellcoaches was excellent. From signing up for the training to my Coach Concierge, and every one of the faculty and fellow students. The well-proven coaching process/theory is something I use every day with my coaching clients and it works! If anyone is interested in becoming a health and well-being coach, sign up for the training. You will never regret it; it will change how you view healthcare. Thank you to everyone at Wellcoaches! Walter Ziske Certified Health and Well-being coach Care Coordinator Gifford Health Card Randolph Vermont Approvals, Accreditations and Continuing Education Enjoy many options for earning continuing education through out global partnerships, approvals and accreditations! Keep growing with us! Launch your new career with a Wellcoaches Certification, which prepares you for additional national and international certifications! 1. Begin with Wellcoaches Training & Certification Foundational coach track for those who want to master coaching competencies. There are three pathways: Certified Health and Well-being Coach Certified Health and Well-being Coach with a Certificate in Lifestyle Medicine Requirements, Costs & Timelines Watch certification video 2. Next, earn the National Board for Health and Wellness Coaching Certification Once you have achieved the Wellcoaches Certification, you may be eligible to become a National Board Certified - Health and Wellness Coach. Requirements, Costs & Timelines 3. Then, earn the International Coach Federation Certification Once you have achieved the Wellcoaches Certification and completed our Advanced Coach Training and Certification, you may be eligible to earn an ICF Certification. Requirements, Costs & Timelines Join Over 14,000 Coaches in 50 Countries As a Wellcoach, you join a strong, mature, international, professional community of like-minded learners who value the highest quality, evidence-based coaching. 14,106 Coaches trained in over 50 countries 21 Staff with ICF or NBHWC certifications 21 Years of coach training 94.5 1,000 Wellcoaches have taken the National Board Exam Our Strategic Partners These world-renowned medical societies have chosen to endorse only Wellcoaches as the leader in coach training. You can be assured that when you say you have been Wellcoaches-trained, you will be recognized as a respected member of the coaching profession, supported by decades of research and advocacy from these leaders in the field of healthcare. Resources & Science Our team writes and presents prolifically on the art and science of coaching. Enjoy our best articles and books written by Wellcoaches faculty, as well as our favorite videos and presentations. Books and Articles Videos Research Health and Well-being Coaching Health and well-being coaching (lifestyle medicine) which can now be billed through self-insured employers. Congratulations to the 1,000 Wellcoaches coaches who are NBHWC-certified. Coach Meg’s NBHWC leadership role has put our field on its way toward a history-making milestone: full Category I approval of the CPT codes for health and well-being coaching services in the next year or so. Meetings with payers to set up reimbursement are underway. We are excited to launch the Wellcoaches Network , a new division of Wellcoaches Corporation alongside our School of Coaching . The Network will connect our wonderful community of great coaches with organizations wanting to bring the highest quality coaches and coaching services in health and well-being to help their leaders, workforce, or patients/clients. Check out the Network Work and Executive Well-being Coaching If your extreme work life demands that you perform like a “corporate athlete”, you can partner with a coach skilled in peak performance to support you in addressing and outgrowing the strains and pressures that never seem to let up. We expanded our coaching and our lifestyle medicine inventory to add a new assessment for all of well-being – mind, body, work, and life, supported by a new well-being inventory for wide use by the Wellcoaches community, including during coach training. Electronic Coaching Record (ECR) Our electronic coaching record supports great coaches and great coaching. Wellcoaches and collaborators developed an electronic coaching record to provide coaching tools, a variety of assessments, coaching outcomes tracking and reporting, and processes for insurance billing. Our digital platform includes coach selection and onboarding, video sessions, and our electronic coaching record to track and report outcomes data.

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Blog Posts (127)

  • Future of work? Find your groove

    I imagine I'm not alone in my fantasy of being a drummer... ...living in the flow of sensing rhythm, creating rhythm, tapping into rhythm, or simply being the rhythm. Alas, like many of us, I don't have a natural aptitude for drumsticks. I look for rhythm, finding my groove, mostly in my work. What's a groove? Merriam-Webster describes a groove as a situation suited to one's abilities and interests, an enjoyable experience or rhythm, a sense of harmony with one's world. Most people who find their groove, find it through work. Gallup authors reported in the book Five Elements of Well-being that career well-being (liking what you do at work) matters the most. In positive psychology, Martin Seligman's PERMA model could be described in terms of grooving - we engage and expand our strengths in activities that bring higher meaning and enable achievement, thereby generating the positive emotions we get from grooving. Self-determination theory is another model of grooving - we have autonomy-supporting relationships, the social nutriments that enable our adventurous pursuit of interesting activities that make us feel ever-more competent through mastering new challenges. Let's give thanks to grooving job crafting scientists, translating positive psychology and self-determination theory into everyday work. They have shown through 100+ studies that we groove when we get to shape our work so that: it's meaningful uses our strengths grows our competence generates nourishing relationships brings interesting opportunities, and supports our non-work well-being - mind, body, and life. Labor Day 2022 If there was ever a moment to find our groove, to reinvent the experience of work, it's now. Those at Gallup who groove in gathering and analyzing data have been telling us for a long while about the crisis of low work engagement (no rhythm, no groove - emotionally detached). The 2022 Gallup global workplace data shows that only 33% of workers in the US and Canada are engaged (the highest scores globally), dropping to 14% in Europe (the lowest scores). The Washington Post noted: More than two years of a pandemic have jolted the meaning of work and the way employees think about it. The consequences are just unfolding... Millennials and Gen Zers are shifting ambitions from wanting to reach the top to having a meaningful effect on their communities, nation and the world. Our jobs are not loving us back, notes a cited Elle article on women's new take on ambition. This summer, McKinsey published an article on COVID 19 as a catalyst to cancel burnout cultures - workplaces that ask from workers more than they get back, throwing them out of their grooves. “People aren’t just quitting their jobs, they’re rejecting the idea that burnout is the price they have to pay for success,” said Arianna Huffington... Whatever accelerating work trend resonates most: the engagement crisis, the great resignation, quiet quitting, or the burnout epidemic, it all boils down to work ill-being, which drives our well-being downhill. More than that, work ill-being is a colossal, if not tragic, waste of human potential. How might we groove at work on a large scale? Zooming out, we can see a shift coming in capitalism - a shift in the longstanding, implicit deal between capital and workers. Recent Harvard Business School Dean Nitin Nohria wrote about it in HBR magazine this summer: Today workers up and down the socioeconomic ladder are reexamining their commitment to employers and the fairness of the existing bargain between capital and labor. Our deep questioning of capitalism is no surprise. If our work lives are a main driver of overall well-being, and work is failing to deliver what humans want dearly, than it is time for a new deal. How about we ask "capitalism" (leaders, bosses, investors) for a new deal: growing wealth and growing well-being together. Instead of consuming well-being for work, we all make well-being a product of work. We need to ask for more than corporate wellness - including physical well-being (eating, exercise, sleep, etc), and mental/emotional well-being (mindfulness, self-compassion, resilience, balance, recharge, etc), along with fair financial compensation. We need to properly integrate our groove - crafting personally meaningful work, that uses our strengths, grows our competence, generates nourishing relationships, and brings interesting opportunities. The future of work is good - more wealth and well-being, grooving together. Coach Meg. www.coachmeg.com Find a coach. Find your groove: www.wellcoachesnetwork.com

  • Wellcoaches’ Gary Sforzo co-authors paper on designing quality research

    The August 2022 Online first edition of the American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine (AJLM) published our new paper about health and well-being coaching research. This issue contains our article (Sebastian Harenberg and Joel Edman are my co-authors) entitled “A Rubric to Assess the Design and Intervention Quality of Randomized Controlled Trials in Health and Wellness Coaching.” While the title is a mouthful, read on. We developed a rubric (a checklist of questions) to examine the quality of a research study from two perspectives: how well the study was designed and how well the coaching intervention was planned and implemented. In all, the rubric we created contains 28 items. Of these, 15 address study design criteria and 13 examine coaching intervention criteria. The questions related to study design assess items such as participant recruitment, participant allocation to group, exclusion criteria, sample size, control group management, outcome measures, and statistical analyses. The rubric questions are scored 0-1 or 0-2, and the greater the total score the better the assessment of study design quality. For studies of health and well-being coaching, it is also essential to examine the structure and implementation of the coaching intervention. The rubric questions addressing the quality of coaching intervention ask about items such as coach training, certification, and experience. Questions on the coaching intervention include coaching session frequency, duration, and program length (in months). Finally, the rubric also calls for a description of the coaching process, coach quality checks during the research project, and client adherence. Using the rubric, a given research paper might potentially score high on study design and low on coaching intervention, or vice versa. The best research papers score high on both dimensions. Check out the full-length article, which is cited below and is available open access from AJLM Sage publishing website. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/15598276221117089 Once the rubric items were selected, they were reviewed by research design and coaching experts. The items were also crossed-scored on 29 articles by the study authors to establish reliability. In other words, all three authors read 29 health and well-being coaching research papers and scored those articles using the rubric. An intraclass correlation of .85 (ICC = .85; CI95% - .68-.93) indicated very good levels of agreement between the three of us (study authors: Harenberg, Sforzo, Edman). These processes of gathering expert opinion and checking reliability provide a measure of validity for the new rubric. We have encouraged other authors to use the rubric in their work and further validate it as a useful tool for assessing health and well-being coaching research. In this paper, we applied the rubric to randomized controlled trials (RCTs) studying patients with Type 2 diabetes (T2D; n = 11 articles) or RCTs studying patients with obesity (n = 18 articles). The total rubric score for the T2D studies turned out to be slightly greater than found for the obesity studies – mainly because the scores for coaching intervention design were higher in the T2D research examined. This serves as a caution for readers of those obesity studies and as a reminder to future researchers of health and well-being coaching when applied in an obese patient population. It is important to carefully design and implement the coaching intervention. Only with a well-designed, described, and implemented coaching protocol can we optimize and best understand the effects of coaching. Those papers with carefully designed and presented coaching methodologies contain the research propelling the field forward and informing us how to apply the best coaching strategies in practice. We believe the most valuable contribution of the new rubric and this publication lies in application for future research. Rather than thinking of the rubric as an evaluation tool, it is best thought of as a roadmap for designing future health and well-being coaching research. When planning a project, researchers can look at the rubric and check off criteria to maximize rubric score and design the best possible study. We know from our Compendium work (2,3) the quantity of health and well-being coaching research is rapidly expanding. It is important to the development of health and well-being coaching profession that the quality of coaching research is continuously improved going forward. This article and the related explanation may seem like way too much information for the average health and well-being coach – why would they need to know how to assess research? Maybe they don’t! However, the typical coach benefits from understanding the status of the existing research and having an appreciation that this base of knowledge is being examined for quality. With such knowledge, a practicing coach can confidently apply state of the art methods and techniques with their clients. We expect application of the rubric will improve the future of health and well-being coaching research and thereby improve the standards of coaching. CITATIONS Harenberg S, Sforzo GA, Edman J. A Rubric to Assess the Design and Intervention Quality of Randomized Controlled Trials in Health and Wellness Coaching. American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine. August 2022. doi:10.1177/15598276221117089 Sforzo GA, Kaye MP, Todorova I, et al. Compendium of the Health and Wellness Coaching Literature. American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine. 2018;12(6):436-447. doi:10.1177/1559827617708562 Sforzo GA, Kaye MP, Harenberg S, et al. Compendium of Health and Wellness Coaching: 2019 Addendum. American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine. 2020;14(2):155-168. doi:10.1177/1559827619850489

  • How positive emotions work at work

    Editor’s Note: This article was originally written as a research dose for the Institute of Coaching. Become a member of the Institute of Coaching to access thousands of resources on coaching science. To get a 40% discount, select Wellcoaches when asked. Positive emotions generate precious resources - they improve thinking, behavior, mood, and physiology, in turn improving self-efficacy, optimism, work engagement, creativity, stress coping and resilience, health, teamwork, relationships, customer satisfaction, and leadership. Positive emotions can be directly improved in organizations using practical techniques, leading to enduring resources and upgrading work enjoyment and performance for all. Introduction In April 2021, we lost a giant in the science of well-being – Ed Diener. This article features one of Ed Diener’s last publications (in collaboration with Stuti Thapa and Louis Tay) – a mega review on positive emotions at work (2020) addressing some important questions for coaching: How are positive emotions defined at work? How can we regulate our positive emotions? How do positive emotions exert their effects? What resources do positive emotions expand in the workplace? What are other interesting findings on positive emotions? 1. How are positive emotions defined at work? The first perspective – discrete positive emotions Scientists have explored and defined “discrete” positive emotions or constructs including gratitude, awe, pride, interest, optimism, and humor. The authors note that this perspective leads to studies of the effects of discrete emotions, for example: “different positive emotions have differential effects on job attitudes where pride is linked to psychological empowerment, interest is linked to work satisfaction, and gratitude is linked to satisfaction with supervisors and colleagues.” One study showed that work-related gratitude positively predicts job satisfaction and negatively predicts emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. Another study showed that awe led to the perception that time is more plentiful, reduced impatience, increased willingness to volunteer time, and much-improved goal progress. The second perspective – positive valence or feeling good The common thread of discrete positive emotions is their underlying dimension of feeling good – they have a positive valence or mood, which brings us to the second perspective. Positive valence (a general sense of feeling good rather than a specific type of good feeling like inspired, enthusiastic or proud) has been shown to be associated with positive individual and organizational outcomes, including better performance and job attitudes. The third perspective – positive adaptive function The authors describe a third perspective - positive adaptive function: “Emotions are regarded as positive insofar as they lead to positive personal and organizational outcomes; positivity is… the outcomes it produces… No emotion is universally “good” or “bad” but its value is context-dependent. For example, anger may be considered to be negative, but it can have prosocial functions if elicited by perceptions of injustice and unfairness and then induces remedial behavior to address the wrongdoing… A recent meta-analysis showed that shame can be positive, as it leads to prosociality and self-improvement when reparative actions can be taken. Although inducing gratitude can lead to prosocial behavior, it can have burdening and negative effects on the helpers.” 2. How can we regulate our positive emotions? First, regulatory approaches that highlight, harness, and sustain positive emotions include cognitive practices such as savoring, positive rumination, journaling, and sharing one’s blessings or gratitude with others. A second approach is behavioral strategies that can improve the quality and quantity of positive emotions including: being present and paying attention to the positive in current moments expressing positive emotions in communications celebrating positive events to amplify positive emotions summoning a specific positive emotion, such as optimism, gratitude, or a positive reinterpretation A third type of emotion regulation promotes emotional integrity—where the inner experience and outer expression of emotions are authentic and aligned. Emotional authenticity is both valued and less draining. An example is the concept of deep acting, as opposed to surface acting, where deep acting is the practice of modifying the inner emotion required of a job, whereas surface acting is merely modifying external emotional expressions. Deep acting is preferable, having shown more positive outcomes than surface acting. A fourth approach in emotion regulation is the multi-faceted construct of emotional intelligence, the ability to understand and distinguish one’s own and others’ emotions and use that knowledge to guide thoughts and behavior. Interestingly, there is a bi-directional street between positive emotions and regulation strategies for positive emotions – more of one generates more of the other, creating an upward spiral. Emotion regulation strategies have been shown effective for both undoing negative emotions and up-regulating positive emotions. A study of six emotion regulation strategies (reflection, reappraisal, rumination, distraction, expressive suppression, and social sharing) found that rumination and expressive suppression decreased positive emotions, whereas reflection increased positive emotions. Positive humor has been shown to down-regulate negative emotion and up-regulate positive emotion. 3. How do positive emotions exert their effects? The authors synthesize the literature into four channels that generate positive outcomes: cognition, affect, behaviors, and physiology. Emotion to cognition to outcome Maintaining (or savoring) and enhancing positive emotions through cognitive processes can promote positive outcomes such as more open-mindedness and more strategic thinking and creativity, which is the basis of positivity spirals (i.e., positive emotions beget more positive emotions— both degree and types of positive emotions) and undoing effects (i.e., positive emotions reduce the effects of negative emotions). In the work context, a study showed that high positivity reduced the impact of negative emotions in reducing job satisfaction. Emotion to behavior to outcome The authors explain: “positive emotions lead individuals to engage in novel and larger behavioral repertoires that lead to new opportunities and building of new skills. Positive emotions are related to positive promotion-focused individual behaviors that are important for worker health and productivity such as healthier eating, exercise, better sleep and stress management, and social behaviors like collaboration and cooperation.” Emotion to emotion to outcome “In addition to the direct experience of positive emotions, emotion expressions act as social information and can spread to others, creating positive emotion contagion. For example, genuine smiles (or Duchenne smiles) promote perceptions of employee friendliness and customer satisfaction; positive emotion expressions are associated with more positive social outcomes such as greater potential for business relationships and cooperation.” Emotion to physiology to outcome Substantial research supports the role of positive emotions in generating positive health outcomes such as greater longevity, lower intensity of illness, higher immune resistance, reduced inflammation, and better physiological recovery. Three physiological systems—cardiovascular functioning (lower heart rate and blood pressure), endocrine functioning, and immune functioning—are improved by positive emotions. 4. What resources do positive emotions expand in the workplace? Positive emotions expand resources, building physical, intellectual, social, and psychological resources that support positive outcomes or buffer against the damage of stressful situations. These resources include longer-term, habitual patterns of cognitions, behaviors, emotional responses, and physiology. The authors explain: “the broaden-and-build theory proffers the view that positive resources are an outcome of cumulative effect of positive emotions over time and are explicitly described as enduring.” These ten enduring resources are listed below and summarized in the Appendix: Positive belief in self, including self-efficacy Creativity Work engagement Stress coping and resilience Health Teamwork Relationships Customer satisfaction Leadership Performance 5. What are other interesting findings on positive emotions? Fluctuations in positive emotion, regardless of the mean levels or intensity of positivity, is maladaptive. A high level of reactivity to negative events (quick drops in positivity) may be maladaptive to well-being. There are daily cycles for positive emotions but not negative emotions, and weekly cycles for both, where people have higher positive affect during the weekend and then “blue Mondays” where people have steep downward slopes in positive emotions. Seasons can influence emotion states – some experience less positive mood in winter than summer. Positive outcomes don’t always emerge from positive emotions, as they can sometimes lead to shallow, cognitive processing. Negative moods can be sadder-but-wiser, leading to deeper cognitive processing. Maximal happiness is not ideal. While those who experience the highest levels of happiness have better close relationships and engage in more volunteer work, those who experience slightly lower levels of happiness have greater success in terms of income, higher rates of employment, and greater political participation. There are cultural differences - happiness is associated with personal achievement in Western societies in contrast to interpersonal connectedness in Eastern societies. In Eastern societies, positive low arousal emotions (e.g., calm) rather than positive high arousal emotions (e.g., excited) appear to be more related to positive outcomes. For example, European Americans preferred excited (versus calm) applicants, whereas the converse was true for Hong Kong Chinese. Individuals’ emotional experiences have a much more profound influence on the judgment of life satisfaction in individualist cultures than in collectivist cultures. It's important to note, that a focus on improving positive emotions in organizations is optimally combined with a focus on navigating negative emotions, including mindfulness, self-compassion, emotional agility, and post-traumatic growth. In February 2022, Wellcoaches shifted its credential title to reflect the value of well-being. While the terms wellness and well-being were used interchangeably, this has now changed. In recent years, the burst of scientific exploration of the domain of well-being has been profound. Well-being has now overtaken wellness as a larger, broader, and deeper construct of human flourishing and thriving. This change is energizing and expansive for the Wellcoaches community as we integrate the fullness of the well-being domain (physical, psychological, life, work) into health and well-being coaching. Takeaways for coaches Organizations can benefit by developing a workplace that cultivates positive emotions. Organizations can consciously manage and shape a positive emotional culture (e.g., a culture of joy/fun/love versus a culture of fear/anger) that can enhance organizational performance downstream. In coaching, you can: Intentionally cultivate authentic positive emotions as resources for change and well-being for your clients during coaching sessions, using appreciative inquiry techniques for example. Consider using the positivity ratio to help your clients get a quick read on their levels of positive emotions and negative emotions. Help your clients understand the various approaches to regulating positive emotions and negative emotions. Help your clients understand the organizational impact of elevating positive emotions – self-belief, engagement, creativity, teamwork, relationships, health, customer satisfaction, leadership, and performance. Citation: Diener, E., Thapa, S., & Tay, L. (2020). Positive emotions at work. Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior, 7, 451-477. Appendix Resources improved by positive emotions in organizations Positive belief in self The authors summarize: “positive emotion enhances positive belief in self that arm individuals against negative consequences of negative experiences. Self-efficacy is one such positive belief that has clear connections to work motivation and performance. There is substantial evidence that positive emotions promote self-efficacy. There is also evidence that people in a good mood set more ambitious goals and have higher expectations. Therefore, people who feel good see the world in a more optimistic light and have more positive beliefs about succeeding, which in turn promotes higher performance downstream. Studies also suggest that positive emotions are related to increases in ego-resilience over time.” Creativity Say the authors: “In the creativity literature, positive emotion (conceptualized often as mood) is one of the most reliable predictors of the creativity process. Multiple meta-analyses of the influence of positive mood on creativity have found positive moods to be a predictor of the creativity process (e.g., flexibility and fluency, the number of unique ideas produced) when compared to control conditions. For example, one study showed that physicians in a positive mood were more flexible and made more accurate diagnoses when solving a case of a patient with liver disease.” Work engagement Work engagement is a positive work-related state of mind, characterized by vigor (high energy and motivation to invest effort at work), dedication (strong involvement in work and experiencing pride and enthusiasm about work), and absorption in work (flow at work). Positive emotions have been shown to be a driver of work engagement, and their lack leading to disengagement. Coping Positive emotions and emotion regulation approaches can help people be resilient and cope with the inherent stress of work, supporting solving problems, planning, and positive reinterpretation rather than some of the less effective emotion-focused strategies such as avoidance, denial, disengagement, and turning to alcohol and drugs. One study showed that those with high levels of emotional intelligence use emotion-focused coping such as venting, denial, and disengagement, for both letting go of negative emotions and prolonging positive emotions (e.g., joy). Health “Multiple meta-analyses have found positive moods to be associated with better health and greater longevity… Research suggests that positive affect was associated with lower blood fat and blood pressure and a healthier body mass index…People with low levels of positive feelings were at a higher risk for heart disease….Experimental studies have found that inducing positive feelings led to faster cardiovascular recovery.” Teamwork “Positive emotions can contribute to collaborative behavior as well as choices and trust. Negotiation studies have found that positive emotions boost cooperative and collaborative behavior instead of withdrawal or competitive behavior. Individuals induced with positive moods are more willing to make concessions. Moreover, displaying positive emotions during negotiations can lead to increased interest in future business relationships and the likelihood of closing a deal as well as greater concession from the other party. In group managerial settings, induced positive affect promoted positive emotion contagion; in turn, it improved cooperation, decreased group conflict, and increased perceived task performance.” Relationships “There is firm evidence for the relation between positive emotions and good relationships; additionally, some studies also show that positive emotions may causally lead to better relationships...Experimental studies find that positive mood induction leads to interpersonal communication and self-disclosure, improved social skill assessments, and lasting social relationships.” Customer satisfaction “There is also a body of work showing a causal relation between positive emotions of employees to positive customer experience. Studies have identified emotion contagion as one of the explanations for how positive mood of workers can lead to better customer satisfaction….One study found that positive behaviors of shoe salespeople, such as greeting, smiling, and eye contact, correlated with customers’ in-store positive mood and subsequently the time they spent in the store and their willingness to shop there again. In general, there is evidence that positive emotions can promote greater sales performance through higher customer satisfaction.” Leadership “Positive emotions are recognized as a crucial aspect of charismatic, transformational, and authentic leadership…Theoretical and empirical work on authentic leadership posits positive emotion as a distinguishing feature between authentic and nonauthentic leadership…Authentic leaders affect employee creativity through the mediating role of employees’ positive affect and hope.” Performance “Research has shown that individuals disposed to positive affectivity perform better in ratings on decisional and interpersonal tasks. Furthermore, positive interpersonal affect has been shown to be associated with better performance ratings…One study found that collective positive emotions led to team resilience, which in turn leads to increased team performance as measured using supervisor ratings.”

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